Car Pics

ART OF LIFE BY BOB ACOSTA & LILLIAN MONTERREY The Timbers at Chama Elk Hunt BOB's GALLERY OF ART LILLIAN & BOB OUR WEDDING at the ELVIS CHAPEL TRIP TO HAWAII TRIP TO ITALY - Rome, Florence & Venice TRIP TO ITALY - Cinque Terre TRIP TO VAIL COLORADO TRIP TO LAKE TAHOE TRIP TO ST LUCIA TRIP TO ST LUCIA #2 Trip to ALASKA Photos of my 67 GT500 #258 FLORIDA ROOF-TECH CORP's GANG HUNTING PICS 1 HUNTING PICS 2

While digging through boxes in my attic, I found these slides of my former 67 Shelby Cobra GT500 Mustang #258

By clicking on the image you can see a larger image. These slides are from the 1980s and have been converted to digital format so some of the quality  and sharpness of the original slide is lost. They are still great in my opinion.

This as I purchased the car. Of course a lot dirtier and in need of detailing and new carbs (the old carbs had a nasty habit of catching on fire ) here and there.

Mustang picnic at CB Smith Park in Pembroke Pines, Florida. The 68 GT350 was Marcelino Sotolongo's, the 66 GT350 was Oscar Leal's and the 67 GT500 was as I purchased the car. It was not black but was a clor called Black Jade which was a metallic green so dark it looked black.

I took these pictures in front of St Hugh's Church in Coconut Grove, Florida.

This picture was taken in 1985 and was as the car was when I sold it.. Though originally a Lime Gold car, it had the Black Jade and then was painted twice (by me) with 1966 Candt Apple Red (a Ford color). I taped and painted the white Lemans Stripes on myself and the car had a 427 sideoiler and a set of 48mm IDA Webers.

Those were 70 series tires up front to help with steering (no power steering) and 10 inch wide McCreary Road Stars on the back. The McCrearys were street legal slicks.

Thi shot was taken on the south side of the Miami International Airport. This was a photo shoot for an article in Mustang Monthly Magazine. The photographer was Jim Smart. He was more interested in airplanes than cars and wanted to go to the airport. He took down the ID numbers of the planes that were close enough to get and said he was going to write them into his log book. I later heard there is a book that airplane afficionados use a log book to document all airplanes thet run across.

Another shot at MIA.

I had just brought the car home from the paint shop the day before. In three days this car was going to a car show and my new Doberman Pincher puppy about 6 months old decided that a 67 Red Shelby hood would be a good chew toy. It got painted and the car made the show and won Best Paint Award.

Sample Photo 9

In the disassembly process and before going to the paint shop, the cowl vent rust holes got "fixed" with what my expertise in these matters and my knowledge as a roofing contractor at the time allowed. In other words, I fixed the rust holes with tar. I shortly thereafter becme very popular with my buddys suffering the same dilemma and several Shelbys left my back yard with what we call in the trade a "Bull & Memnbrane" job to stop the water leaks through the cowls.

Side Shot

This is why I describe the reaction when I would open the hood of this car at any car meet like "Flies to Dog Poop" cause everyone came to see. The car's look, history, mystique, the color and the massive engine's rumble made everyone look at this car when driving down the street. Even if you were driving a brand new Corvette and your head was on fire, people would still be looking, mesmerized by this car.

Nice addition to any FE Ford engine.

Rear tailight shot.. I would take many shots of this car and other 67 Shelbys because there were so many differences between each car. Everything from the gas cap, the taillight lens, the trim around the lens, the fastening of the fiberglass panel, the lip of the trunk and the trunk itself are different from car to car. I bet there are many other differences I don't know about. That is what make these cars so unique. They weren't cookie-cutter cars. They were put together from parts from several sources and improved on throughout production so there is no set rule that they have to be like this or that. What is known is what has been seen on unmolested cars that can verify the differences came from Ford or Shelby American and modifications made by someone later. I remember seeing hooks and clampdown brackets in the trunks of early Shelby Mustangs and even wrote to Rick Kopec of SAAC, about it then and he replied that there were many variations and he had seen many differences too.

Trick shot. The background was erased out. This was the car at the show where it won the Best Paint Award. Notice No Strpies.

SWEET!